rose hip rosehips foraging forage forager free food in the wild october thrifty sustainability

Foraging in October – Free food in the wild

Free

Foraging for food in the wild is a fantastic way to bulk out your meals for free.

rose hip rosehips foraging forage forager free food in the wild october thrifty sustainability

Rose Hips – free food in the wild

It’s also great exercise, great for connecting with nature and great for boosting your self-esteem as you start to discover the wealth of free food that’s just poking out of the ground or dangling off a tree in your local area… if you only know what to look for!

Here is a short list of the kinds of foods that are ready to find and pick in October, each item in the list is a link that will show you a description on Wikipedia, so that you may identify the food correctly before you pick and eat it.

Foraging in October:

Beech nuts    Beefsteak fungus    Blackberries    Blewit    Cauliflower fungus    Cep    Chanterelle    Chickweed    Crab apples    Dandelion root    Elderberries    Fairy-ring Champignon    Field mushrooms    Giant puffball mushrooms    Hazelnut/Cobnuts    Hedgehog fungus    Hops    Horse mushroom   Jack-by-the-hedge    Jelly ear    Juniper    Medlar    Nettle    Oyster mushroom    Parasol mushroom    Rose hips    Rowan    Saffron milk cap    Sea beet    Shaggy cap    Sloe    Sweet chestnuts    Velvet shank    Walnut

For a fantastic Sloe Gin recipe, take a look at this Thrifty Sustainability post: Make it – Sloe Gin

Be safe when foraging, make sure that you are picking something edible and not something poisonous! It is a good idea to use a guide book or to research online before you go foraging. For example, try looking up each of the above on Wikipedia to find an accurate image and description.

I recommend the following books about foraging for free food – they help you to identify, harvest, prepare and preserve your findings:
My favourite is ‘Food for Free‘, because it is a pocket-sized guide that you can take out foraging.

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blackberry forraging forrage for free food in the wild pick free food foraging forage find edible

Foraging in September – Free food in the wild

Free

Foraging for free food in the wild is a fantastic way to bulk out your meals for free.

blackberry forraging forrage for free food in the wild pick free food foraging forage find edible

Blackberries

It’s also great exercise, great for connecting with nature and great for boosting your self-esteem as you start to discover the wealth of free food that’s just poking out of the ground or dangling off a tree in your local area… if you only know what to look for!

Below is a short list of the kinds of foods that are ready to find and pick in September, each item in the list is a link that will show you a description on Wikipedia, so that you may identify the food correctly before you pick and eat it.

Be safe when foraging, make sure that you are picking something edible and not something poisonous! It is a good idea to use a guide book or to research online before you go foraging. For example, try looking up each of the below on Wikipedia to find an accurate image and description.

Foraging in September:

Beech nuts     Bilberry     Black mustard     Blackberries     Blewit     Cauliflower fungus     Cep     Chanterelle     Clover flowers     Crab apples     Dandelion roots     Elderberries     Fairy-ring Champignon     Field mushroom     Giant puffball mushroom     Hawthorn berries     Hazelnut/Cobnuts     Heather flowers     Hedgehog fungus     Honey fungus     Hop fruits     Horse mushroom     Inkcaps     Jack-by-the-hedge     Juniper     Parasol mushroom     Poppy     Raspberries     Rosehip    Rowan berries     Saffron milk cap     Sea beet     Shaggy cap     Velvet shank     Wild service tree     Wild strawberry

 

I recommend the following books about foraging for free food – they help you to identify, harvest, prepare and then preserve your findings:

My favourite is ‘Food for Free‘, because it is a pocket-sized guide that you can take out foraging.

If you would like to receive Thrifty Sustainability updates by email when a new article is added, please subscribe here: